Parliamentary Question: WikiLeaks case, transparency, press freedom and access to information in the EU

Marietje

Parliamentary questions

9 September 2010 E-7329/2010 Question for written answer to the Commission Rule 117 Marietje Schaake (ALDE) Subject: WikiLeaks case, transparency, press freedom and access to information in the EU On 10 August the Daily Beast Blog reported that the Obama administration had asked several of its allies, including some EU Member States, to consider filing criminal charges against the founder of WikiLeaks, Julian Assange (http://www.thedailybeast.com/blogs-and-stories/2010-08-10/a-western-crackdown-on-wikileaks/). 1. Can the Commission confirm that such a request has been made at EU level? If not, in which other ways has the US administration contacted the Commission with regard to either Julian Assange or the activities of WikiLeaks? 2. If the Commission has indeed been approached by the US administration, what is its reply? 3. Has the Commission taken any action towards WikiLeaks? Does the Commission agree that the EU should speak with one voice on this matter, so as to avoid a potential threat to the free movement of persons? If not, why not? 4. Does the Commission agree that the EU should stand by and defend the TEU when it comes to transparency, accountability, access to information and documents, press freedom, freedom of expression, and due process? If not, why not? 5. Can the Commission guarantee that no censorship, website blocking or other infringement of these basic freedoms will take place under the auspices of the Commission related to the WikiLeaks incident? If not, why not? 6. Does the Commission agree that technology has an impact on democracy, human rights and fundamental freedoms? If not, why not? 7. Does the Commission agree that the EU needs a common policy regarding the impact of technology and the Internet on democracy and human rights, both within the EU and in relation to external actions? Would active promotion of unfettered access to information and to the Internet be part of such a policy? Is the Commission prepared to make access to the Internet an integral part of its efforts and communications in the field of human rights? If not, why not? Please find the answer here.